Root Canals (Endodontics)

The purpose of root canal treatment is to remove diseased or infected nerve tissue. This procedure allows us to save a tooth that otherwise would have to be extracted. Some indications that you may need a root canal are pain when chewing, or when eating or drinking hot or cold foods or liquids.

Root canals are not painful. Anesthetic is used to numb the tooth before any treatment is started. After a root canal is performed, the tooth will require a crown to protect it from breaking. While we may be able to perform your root canal procedure in our office, often times the complexity of the root anatomy and/or emergency basis upon which many root canals are required we may choose to work with an endodontic specialist whom we trust and acts as an extension of our team.

The alternative to a root canal is to extract the tooth. Root canals can fail if not properly restored: they can leak and become infected or may break if not crowned. Other causes of failure include accessory canals or chronic, long term infection in the bone around the root.

While the root canals images on this page were from actual procedures performed by Dr. N Head, our office recommends working with a dental specialist to obtain the best results from endodontic procedures. Call our office (843.556.3838) for more information about the specialists we work with!

This tooth had irreversibly inflamed and partially necrotic pulp necessitating root canal therapy.  This is the "before" image with the nerve and pulpal tissues still intact.

This tooth had irreversibly inflamed and partially necrotic pulp necessitating root canal therapy.

This is the "before" image with the nerve and pulpal tissues still intact.

This is that "after" picture, with the nerve and pulpal tissues of the tooth removed and replaced with a root canal filling material called gutta percha. Notice the complexities at the end of the roots.

This is that "after" picture, with the nerve and pulpal tissues of the tooth removed and replaced with a root canal filling material called gutta percha. Notice the complexities at the end of the roots.